Episode 90: Let’s Get Digital… Digital.

Ben recommends a book that he’s been enjoying: What Doesn’t Kill Us: How Freezing Water, Extreme Altitude and Environmental Conditioning Will Renew Our Lost Evolutionary Strength. Ben’s started taking cold showers, but Nathan remains unconvinced (and warm). (0:17)

Looking for an LSAT prep course? Consider Ben’s 100-Hour Online LSAT Course or Nathan’s Fox LSAT On Demand class. Learn in person, over skype, or online from the guys you already enjoy listening to! (4:28)

Nathan shares some (pretty unsurprising) news out of Yale Law School this week. Following Harvard’s recent announcement that they would be accepting GRE scores from law school applicants, Yale proclaims they will likewise accept scores from the GRE. What’s next—Stanford?!? Probably. (8:48)

The LSAC is seeking participants for their Digital LSAT Pilot Test on May 20. The test will be tablet-based and is taking place at 20 sites throughout the United States. While no official score will be reported, this could be a good chance to practice for the real thing. Benefits to the 1,000 chosen guinea pigs include a $100 gift card, analysis of their test performance, and the eternal gratitude of The Thinking LSAT Podcast (pending your full report of the pilot). The application period ends April 15 so apply ASAP. (9:55)

Emails abound on Episode 90 of the show! Hear Nathan and Ben respond to these listeners:

Desperate Sarah wonders if a great score on the June LSAT could work as a bargaining chip on the schools that have waitlisted her. (24:08)

Boston Eric improved 10 points since his diagnostic in January and asks if the guys think it’s possible for him to jump 5-10 more by June. (35:35)

Nervous Ted put off taking a diagnostic LSAT because he was worried about what a low score would mean for his future. Family support and this podcast convinced him he had to see where he was starting from. (47:58)

Impatient Jenny plans to take the June LSAT and apply to start law school this fall—like, three months after this June, fall. (Mistake.) (55:25)

Wonderful-wedding-guest Anita works as a lobbyist in the state legislature but wants to become a litigator. She is worried about her practice scores fluctuating between 160-171 and hopes the guys have tips on stabilizing her score. (1:10:53)

We continue Logical Reasoning Section 3 of the June 2007 LSAT with Question 22, a Must Be True question involving conditional reasoning and some tricky word order. To play at home, just download the free test; work through Section 3, Question 22; listen in as we discuss the solution. (1:19:25)

Got questions you want us to answer in a future podcast? Send us an email at help@thinkinglsat.com or follow us @thinkinglsat and tweet us a question!

Take a listen and let us know what you think.

8 Comments


  1. I signed up for the Digital LSAT Pilot test! Thanks for passing the info along. It will be great practice for the June LSAT I am taking. They didn’t one in Seattle, but fortunately I work for an airline, so I’m flying down to Oregon to take it.

    Reply

  2. Sort of the eleventh hour for sign-up here, but I’m in Chicago where both nearby locations are full. Madison, WI, however, is still open as of this writing and I’m planning to take the two-and-a-half hour drive. If anyone wants to kick in for gas I’d be happy to offer a ride.

    And thanks, Ben and Nathan, for this information and for all the work you put into the podcast!

    Reply

    1. More dedication. This is awesome. Good luck on the test and finding a fellow traveler.

      Reply

  3. I wanted to sign up! I am one of Nathan’s former students in Las Vegas and they are having a digital test here. But alas, I will be out of town, boooo…

    Reply

    1. Thanks everybody! We’re very happy with the response on this, and can’t wait to hear your reports from the pilot.

      Reply

  4. The GRE has math sections in addition to sections that focus on verbal skills. The LSAT does not have a math section. The acceptance of the GRE will help those students who do not have as strong verbal skills.

    Reply

    1. I’m not sure that would really “help” them though. Getting into law school without strong verbal skills seems like a recipe for a very tough time with law school, the bar exam, and a legal career.

      Lawyers are gladiators who do battle using the English language. As such, lawyers need very strong English language abilities.

      Reply

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