• Nathan Fox

Ep. 120: Back to the LSAT

Welcome to 2018, dear listeners. Nathan and Ben ring in the new year by answering a few LSAT questions on air. By popular demand, the guys tackle logical-reasoning and reading-comprehension questions from the June 2007 LSAT. Of course, you’ll get this same kind of in-depth look at LSAT problem-solving when you take Ben’s free online LSAT course, or Nathan’s free online LSAT course.


2:49 – LR Question 1—The guys kickoff the show with a later LR question—#24 from section three of the June 2007 LSAT. It’s a Strengthen question in which a sociologist posits that silly romantics who claim that us humans aren’t born evil (it’s the institutions we make that render us so)—they’re dead wrong. Nathan and Ben discuss each line of the question and implement the most valuable strategy of all: taking one’s time.


19:10 – LR Question 2—Next up, the guys tackle question #25 from the same section, regarding the survival of Australopithecus Afarensis. Nathan points out that this question introduces the LSAT’s most common flaw, and it’s something you’ll see on every LSAT. Tune in to find out what it is.


34:50 – RC Question 1—Moving right along to section four. The guys jump back in where they left off episodes upon episodes ago with passage number three: the one about the World. Wide. Web. Thinking LSAT crew, are you ready? Take a trip back in time to see what the LSAC found concerning about copyright law as it pertained to referencing (and linking) 3rd party content in your own work on the web. Considering that’s what the entire landscape of today’s use of the internet looks like, it’s pretty amusing. Ben and Nathan go over how to quickly pick apart the passage through predictive reading. How to home in on the main point. And how to slay incorrect answer choices with lightning speed. They hit all of the questions for this RC passage, so you’ll get an in-depth look at how they each approach reading passages.


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Posted in Law School Applications, LSAT

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